Dr. Cohen goes to Washington

Dr. Cohen represented Division 46, Media Psychology and Division 31, State Provincial and Territorial Affairs at the program chair conference in Washington D.C. for the American Psychological Association. Our intent was to meet each other and form collaborative programs that go hand in hand with each other's work.

Dr. Cohen is looking for filmmakers and Mental Health Care Professionals for his next book. Please contact him if interested in collaborating. drjoshcohen@filmandvideobasedtherapy.com

                        

JoshuaLee Cohen PhD

Bio

Dr. Cohen is currently a media psychologist and the program chair for the American Psychological Association's Media Psychology Division for the convention in Washington D.C. in 2017. As a media psychologist, member of the Los Angeles County Psychological Association Foundation board,  and author and co-editor of Video and Filmmaking as Psychotherapy: Research and Practice, he realizes how important it is to be licensed in this field. He has a business license in the city of Long Beach for educational purposes and also works in the mental health field with clients. He was trained as an Avid and Final Cut Pro Editor in Burbank California and has a PhD in clinical Psychology with an emphasis in depth psychology. He draws from his background in clinical psychology to help educate the public and health professionals about important mental health information through the powerful and fun language of story in webinars, workshops, and individual sessions. 

Dr. Cohen graduated from Colorado College where he graduated with a degree in film and anthropology and  he wrote his thesis on using films as part of a healing process. He hosted a seminar at Colorado College for Gary Solomon on Cinematherapy and later interviewed  filmmakers for his thesis such as Doug PrayEb LottimerNeal Baer,  Andrew Mudge, and Marc Webb.  While filming a documentary based on his thesis. Josh’s unofficial film/video  background began in childhood but his work at KRDO as an intern in 1997 helped establish some of his professional skills and experience with film and it’s connection to psychology. Other experiences with film in the next few years also contributed to his psychological lens of looking at film. While at CC he also worked on Dee Sneider’s Strangeland.  He trained at Video Symphony later on to learn about the Avid and Final Cut Pro. After working on Student films and training Josh and Doug Pray collaborated on a short video about the Dalai Lama and technology in 2001 and was shown at LAFCPUG on October 22,  2003 At the same time, he met Martin Cohen who introduced him to Patrick Swayze where he worked as an assistant (uncredited) for One Last Dance, then called Without a Word. Further work in Hollywood included help on films such as Anna May Wong, Frosted Yellow Willows: Her Life, Times and Legend  (uncredited) by Elaine Mae Woo on AnnaMae Wong . He also worked with Karen Grosso, on films for the Ronald McDonald House (uncredited). In addition he worked for Andrew Van Slee at Extraordinary films raising money for and assisting John Rosenberg with editing for Net Games. (uncredited). Josh then Married Mary Kocman from CC in in Santa Ana in 2005. Josh also gained a Master’s degree in General Psychology from Walden University in 2007 and continued his research on the healing power of film. Mary works at PVLD and helped with interlibrary loans and assisted with library resources for the thesis. In 2009 Josh started his practicum for his doctoral program at TTC. He finished his Practicum hours and his internship at Families in New Directions. In 2009 he was clinically supervised by James Hillman, author of Revisioning Psychology where he was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, for practicum supervision.  In 2012, Josh finished his PhD in clinical psychology at Pacifica Graduate institute.  His dissertation was on the use of video and other film based therapy in therapeutic practice.  

About Paul McDowell Petschek

My practice not only explores how Somatic Experiencing can be effective in treating PTSD (even the most complex kinds) but also SD, Stress Disorders, of all kinds.

 

 

Andrew Mudge

Andrew Mudge ’97 made his first movie at age 12. Wielding a camera with a separate VCR strapped around his neck, he filmed a neighbor’s little brother playing “Terminator,” wreaking havoc around their Boston neighborhood. 

Fast forward to 2003, and both Mudge and the Terminator have found success in broader arenas. The Terminator is now governing California, and Mudge is making his first full-length feature film after winning a Chrysler contest for aspiring directors. The award provides $1 million for Mudge’s next project as well as a production deal and a mentor at Universal Studios. 

Mudge says he didn’t think of movies as a serious art form until he got to CC and met film professor Tom Sanny, who lent his expertise and equipment to several short film projects. “Tom and I got along great. Without him, I don’t know what I would have done,” says Mudge. 
While at CC, and after Mudge’s graduation as an anthropology major, the two worked on shorts including the oddly hilarious “Chicken Pox Pal,” which was picked up by the 2000 Sundance Film Festival. 

Mudge will start filming his screenplay “The P.T. Johansen Field Guide to North American Monsters” next summer at Universal. The comedic plot centers around a dejected Bigfoot hunter and his hoaxer son. Add a skeptical 10-year-old Cub Scout to the mix, and audiences should have a tough time not laughing. Mudge is hoping for national release — and hopefully the Bulletin will let you know when and where it opens.

– Peter Rice ’05

                                 

Doug's bio

For three summers, 2011-2014, filmmakers Doug Pray and Peter J. Vogt, in association with Northwest Film Forum, have been proud to present Wild Mind Film Camp, an 11-day intensive master class for documentary filmmaking in the Washington Cascades.

If you're visiting our website for the first time, the following is a brief overview of what we're about. Our next 11-day summer program will not be held until summer 2016. Please let us know if you would like to be on our mailing list to receive information about Wild Mind programs and other workshops we may offer at: info@wildmindfilmcamp.com.  Thank you for your interest!

The term "Wild Mind" means "starting now, ready for anything." Gary Snyder, the American-Buddhist/poet/ecologist defines it as being "elegantly self-disciplined, self-regulating. That’s what wilderness is. Nobody has a management plan for it." Similarly, good filmmaking is a practice that can be prepared for but never completely controlled. It requires innovation in the moment, trust in the process, and a great deal of courage. A Wild Mind is focused, aware, and curious. It accepts rigor, enjoys challenge, endures failure, and delights in the documentary filmmaking process.

Wild Mind Film Camp is a hands-on, in-depth learning experience for twelve developing professionals and inspired nonfiction filmmakers who want to dramatically improve their documentary skills and knowledge. Each day features a mix of classes, workshops, and live production in a supportive community atmosphere. Amidst the astonishing beauty and fascinating culture of the Methow River Valley, this is a rare and excellent opportunity to work one-on-one with real pros, real equipment, and real subjects.

 

Some of Doug's films

 

  ""I'm studying the  effect of negative reinforcement on esp ability"

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Peter is one of three doctors of parapsychology on the Ghostbusters team. He holds PhDs in both parapsychology and psychology. Originally his professional interests were focused on paranormal phenomena like ESP; he appeared not to believe in ghosts until he actually saw one. In the movies, he is characterized by his flippant persona, his approach to his profession as a scientific charlatan, and his womanizing demeanor.[5] Fred Pfeilsees in him a postmodern hero, whose level of "crass self-interest" safeguards him from being ensnared by a stereotypical role.[6]

Despite Venkman's lackadaisical attitude, from time to time he has created inventions that help the Ghostbusters save the day, and he is shrewd and more street-smart than either Ray Stantz or Egon Spengler. Venkman serves as the front man for the group and possesses more social ability than the more academically inclined Ray and Egon. For instance, he is the one who is able to persuade the city mayor to release them after being arrested, return their equipment and otherwise support their attempt to stop Gozer."

ghostbusters.jpeg

To visit a real ghostbuster, visit a psychologist who is licensed.....

Ghostbusters begins in the library....

http://www.pvld.org/newsletters/film

Neal Baer

CV

1 NEAL BAER, MD TELEVISION and FILM 2013- Executive Producer, Showrunner, Writer, 

The Los Angeles County Psychological Association Foundation seeks to promote mental health advocacy through informed, strategic giving to individuals, community mental health providers, and mental health advocacy organizations whose mission is to serve marginalized populations. 

Learn more about what we do by watching the video below:

References:

D. (2007). Discovering Anna May Wong. Retrieved May 10, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7famM6ABr 

Hirschman, E. C. (2000). Heroes, monsters & messiahs: Movies and television shows as the mythology of American culture. Kansas City, MO: Andrews McMeel Pub. 

I. R. (2009). Ghostbusters opening scene. Retrieved May 10, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fn7-JZq0Yx 

LACPA Foundation. (n.d.). Retrieved May 10, 2016, from http://www.lacpafoundation.org/ 

Peninsula Friends of the Library. (n.d.). Retrieved May 10, 2016, from http://www.pvldfriends.org/donat 

 Peter Venkman. (n.d.). Retrieved May 10, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Venkman 

New Age crystals, pilgrimages to Red Indian healing grounds and remedies recommended by well-wishers… Patrick Swayze admits he will try anything to beat cancer - (Daily Mail). (n.d.). Retrieved May 10, 2016, from http://ssristories.org/famous-actor-patrick-swayzes-sister-died-from-overdose-of-antidepressants-199ssri-editor-2/ 

Richard-listens. (n.d.). Retrieved May 10, 2016, from http://www.richardlistens.com/ 

Woo, E. M. (2007). Anna May Wong: Frosted Yellow Willows, a Documentary. Retrieved May 10, 2016, from http://www.anna-may-wong.com/home.ht 

Don't try to be Superman: be prepared for the worst but plan for the best.

Don't try to be Superman

 

take care of your family first and be prepared for the worst but plan for the best before helping others. We can all save the world if we do our jobs the best we can be or just be the best person we can within our own competency. We can't control nature, but we can honor and appreciate its beauty and power. A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves. Lao Tzu

(this business is still under development)

Joshua L Cohen PhD is a movie doctor. He uses stories to help prevent mental health crises before they can begin California has been prone to serious earthquakes in recent years. While earthquakes with the power of the one that hit the greater Los Angeles area in January 1994 are rare, smaller earthquakes can interrupt your normal living patterns and cause injury. During a major earthquake, you may hear a roaring or rumbling sound that gradually gets louder. You may feel a rolling sensation that starts out gently and within a second or two grows violent, or you may first be jarred by a violent jolt. A second or two later, you may feel shaking and find it difficult to stand up or move from one room to another. The key to surviving an earthquake and lowering your risk of injury is in planning, preparing and practicing what you and your family will do if it happens." 

 

Doug Pray and Pete Vogt interview:(slightly delayed broadcast)

Director Doug Pray’s exuberant portraits of subcultures and maverick individuals have led him to three Sundance premieres, critical raves, numerous awards, and worldwide distribution. His feature documentaries include the Emmy Award-winning "Art & Copy," as well as "Surfwise," "Big Rig," "Infamy," "Scratch," and "Hype!," several of which he also edited or shot. His newest film, "Levitated Mass," is about artist Michael Heizer and a 340-ton boulder, and will be released in 2014. Doug has directed dozens of commissioned short films and documentary-style commercials for a wide range of major clients, including an AIDS awareness campaign, which won him his first Emmy. He grew up in Madison, Wisconsin, has a BA in sociology from Colorado College, and an MFA from the UCLA School of Film and Television. He lives in Los Angeles where he is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, The Directors Guild of America, and has served on the jury of numerous film festivals including Sundance, SXSW, AFI, Big Sky, and Silverdocs. He has been a guest professor at many of the top film schools in the country and loves teaching almost as much as he loves documentary filmmaking. Visit: www.dougpray.com.

For three summers, 2011-2014, filmmakers Doug Pray and Peter J. Vogt, in association with Northwest Film Forum, have been proud to present Wild Mind Film Camp, an 11-day intensive master class for documentary filmmaking in the Washington Cascades.

If you're visiting our website for the first time, the following is a brief overview of what we're about. Our next 11-day summer program will not be held until summer 2016. Please let us know if you would like to be on our mailing list to receive information about Wild Mind programs and other workshops we may offer at: info@wildmindfilmcamp.com.  Thank you for your interest!

The term "Wild Mind" means "starting now, ready for anything." Gary Snyder, the American-Buddhist/poet/ecologist defines it as being "elegantly self-disciplined, self-regulating. That’s what wilderness is. Nobody has a management plan for it." Similarly, good filmmaking is a practice that can be prepared for but never completely controlled. It requires innovation in the moment, trust in the process, and a great deal of courage. A Wild Mind is focused, aware, and curious. It accepts rigor, enjoys challenge, endures failure, and delights in the documentary filmmaking process.

Wild Mind Film Camp is a hands-on, in-depth learning experience for twelve developing professionals and inspired nonfiction filmmakers who want to dramatically improve their documentary skills and knowledge. Each day features a mix of classes, workshops, and live production in a supportive community atmosphere. Amidst the astonishing beauty and fascinating culture of the Methow River Valley, this is a rare and excellent opportunity to work one-on-one with real pros, real equipment, and real subjects.

Webinar 2 Trauma and Digital Storytelling by Joshua L Cohen PhD and Kim Anderson, Ph.D., LCSW

Abstract from the book Video and FIlmmaking as Psychotherapy: Research and Practice

This interview is based on the chapter digital storytelling (DS) as a trauma narrative intervention, in the book Video and Filmmaking as Psychotherapy: Research and Practice published by Routledge.  The context of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, for children exposed to domestic violence who received mental health services at a rural domestic violence agency.  In this work, we sought to better understand the individual and collective benefits of the various elements of DS (i.e., digital images, text, audio narration, and music).  In doing so, we provide mental health clinicians with practical information on narrative development to use in their own practices.  Our project findings indicated that DS is a powerful tool to help children process their traumatic experiences.  

Click on Dr. Cohen to watch the webinar. 

Click on Dr. Cohen to watch the webinar

 

Click on the image to watch the webinar

Keywords: children exposed to domestic violence, digital storytelling, trauma narrative

Your Digital Storytelling Project Webinar Opens Today Brought to you by Sookasa

In this first webinar, we will start by mentioning a company that has offered a discount to their product which will protect your video files on the web through a company that encrypts your information online at a level compliant through HIPAA and protects companies such as Dropbox, Google Drive, and other cloud based services. The company, Sookasa, has offered a discount code "film therapy" as a incentive for watching this webinar. If you would like to learn more about Sookasa, please visit their webinars online through vimeo. HIPAA is a federal law that protects medical records of people in the united states to preserve their privacy in the United States. Privacy is a basic human right that is backed by the United Nations (Johnson & Cohen, 2015).  

Next,  a film editor, who is trained in Somatic Experiencing and Hypnotherapy, will discuss how editing and film production relate to body-related processes that can assist in the resolution of trauma. Dr. Cohen and Your Digital Storytelling Project LLC plan future webinars for mental health practitioners that provide CEU continuing education credits and a certificate for film/video-based therapy. 

Paul and I would like to inform the public of our intent in this webinar. He says to think of this as our version of  “My Dinner with Andre”. A caual discussion about philosophy between professionals in different fields who have similar interests.  We invite the viewers to explore and continue this discussion in a productive, healing way. Keep in mind that ethical standards apply to the use of film/video-based therapy as defined by Cohen and Johnson (2015).  For more ethical concerns, please read  the chapter, A challenge to readers : ethical considerations in film- and video-based therapies (Johnson & Cohen, 2015). 

The webinar also refers to other chapters from the book Video and Filmmaking as Psychotherapy: Research and Practice, published by Routledge. This includes the following: Digital Video storytelling : Healing for the YouTube generation of veterans / Rivka Tuval-Mashiach and Benjamin Patton. Joshua L Cohen PhD and Penelope P. Orr on technology Film/video-based therapy and editing as process from a depth psychological perspective.

This webinar is not an official representation of the APA (American Psychological Association) or the entertainment industry or Somatic Experiencing, but rather two professionals/experts in their fields discussing their observations and findings and having an impromptu discussion that is intended to be ongoing.

Although this book opens up ideas that may be controversial, that is the intent and why it was presented at APA's convention in Toronto in 2015  with several of the authors present. Dr Cohen presented this material many other conferences throughout the United States. The first book is intended to introduce film/video-based therapy to the world.  

For more information about Your Digital Storytelling Project LLC please visit

www.yourdigitalstorytellingproject.com

To learn more about the book Video and Filmmaking as Psychotherapy:Research and Practice, published by Routledge, please visit 

www.filmandvideobasedtherapy.com 

 

Reference

Cohen, J. L., & Johnson, J. L. (2015). Video and filmmaking as psychotherapy: Research and practice. New York, NY: Routledge:Taylor and Francis.

  • Presenter(s) : Joshua L Cohen PhD and Paul Petschek SEP, C.Ht.

 

 

Dr. Cohen is a Media Psychologist and the Program Chairperson for the AmericanPsychological Association's  (APA) Media Psychology Division 46 and Territorial Psychological Association Affairs, Division 31 of the APA and their Program Chairson for the convention for the APA in Washington D.C. in 2017.  Dr Cohen is also a member of 

  • Division of Trauma Psychology, division 56 of the APA. Association of State, and the  Society for the Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts;Division 10 of the APA
  • Division for Quantitative and Qualitative Methods, Division 5 of the APA.
  • He is a  member of the Los Angeles County Psychological Association Foundation and a board member.
  • He is the author and co-editor of “Video and Filmmaking as Psychotherapy: Research and Practice”.
  • Trained  as an Avid and Final Cut Pro Editor in Burbank, California and has a PhD in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in Depth Psychology.
  • He worked in Hollywood with Lisa Niemi and Patrick Swayze  in 2001 on their film Without a Word which was then changed to One Last Dance
  • he worked with Doug Pray on a short film about the Dalai Lama which can be seen in the book Video and Filmmaking as Psychotherapy:Research and Practice published by Routledge. 
  • Faculty at University of Phoenix online campus

Paul Petschek has worked extensively throughout the U.S. and overseas as an editor and a professor of editing techniques and aesthetics. He has worked also in production, on notable films such as Desperately Seeking Susan and The Karate Kid. He has had the pleasure of working with industry icons such as Martin Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker on A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese through American Movies, on studio pictures such as Waterworld and Flipper, and on independent films such as 39 Pounds of LoveMost, and New York Street Games. His films have appeared in numerous festivals and have been nominated for Academy Awards in the U.S. and Israel.  Paul was educated in Visual Arts at Harvard, where he graduated Magna Cum Laude.  While still active in film, as a Certified Somatic Experiencing Practitioner (S.E.P.) and as a Certified Hypnotherapist (C.Ht.) Paul works with a select and diverse clientele to improve the conditions of their life through a mixture of these two methodologies and the metaphor of film and film process.

Star Wars and Pacifica Graduate Institute

"In April of 2002, the Joseph Campbell Library on the campus ofPacifica Graduate Institute was visited by a film crew directed by Tsukuru Matsuki from Kyodo Television of Tokyo. They were filming for an episode in a television documentary series called "Passion for Arts" which was aired nationally in Japan that year via TV Tokyo, and the broadcast included footage of the Joseph Campbell Library, as well as its Special Collections Librarian talking about The Hero with a Thousand Faces. The subject of this episode was not Campbell, but rather a man who had been deeply influenced by him, the filmmaker George Lucas.

Joseph Campbell often said that he thought that the artists were one group of people who could use his work on Mythology. He had wanted to be a novelist during the 1930's, before he decided that he was a better scholar than fiction writer, and he was married to a noted dancer, so he had an understanding of what artists needed. He felt that the best art, including the work of Picasso and Paul Klee, was grounded in Mythology"

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